GTM Unleashed: Wake Up, World: No One Cares About Your Shiny Features!

As businesses worldwide drown in their hubris, tirelessly flaunting feature after feature, one cannot help but yawn at their tedious, misguided songs of self-praise1. Let’s cut through the chase: Nobody really cares about your latest whiz-bang gadgetry in this epoch of instant gratification. They care about how you’re going to make their lives outrageously better.

The age-old marketing mantra, “sell benefits, not features,” is not just a catchphrase – it’s the holy grail. Yet, so many are blind to its wisdom2. Features are like the ingredients in a gourmet dish: necessary, but not what makes the diner’s mouth water. The taste, the aroma, the experience – these are what pull them in. Similarly, consumers are seeking transformative experiences, not technical jargon.

Consider Apple’s iconic iPod launch. They didn’t harp on about memory size or battery life. Their message? “1,000 songs in your pocket. “3 Simply put, they sold the dream, not the device.

Brands that fixate on features are like that insufferable braggart at a party, tirelessly recounting every minor achievement, missing the room’s collective eye-roll4. On the other hand, those selling benefits whisper seductively into the consumer’s ear, promising change, growth, and exhilaration.

The provocateur challenges you: Shift your focus. Dive deep into the desires and dreams of your audience. What makes them tick? What keeps them up at night? Your features might be the answer, but remember, solutions are dry without the context of a question.

In a world teeming with look-alikes, don’t just be another face in the crowd. Be the siren song that calls out, luring consumers to the shores of betterment.

“In the theatre of business, features are the props, but benefits? They’re the storyline that leaves the audience spellbound.” – Anonymous

Footnotes

  1. ​Harvard Business Review: “Marketing Myopia”​
  2. ​Psychology Today: The Psychology of Choice​
  3. ​Cult of Mac: An illustrated history of the iPod and its massive impact​
  4. ​Psychology Today: “The Power of Persuasion”​

Like this message? Give me two minutes a day and I’ll help you scale your business so that customers are willing to pay a premium for what you offer and keep paying for it.